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20110701
20110731
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Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
forces have been bearing down on al qaeda and the taliban in pakistan and afghanistan. osama bin laden has been killed and al qaeda is significantly weakened. in afghanistan british and international forces have driven al qaeda from its bases and while it is too early to tell for certain initial evidence suggests we halted the momentum of the taliban insurgency in its heartland. mr. speaker, we are entering a new phase in which the afghan forces will do more of the fighting and patrolling and our forces training and mentoring. as president obama said last month the mission is changing from, that to support. when we arrived there was no one to hand over to. no proper army or police. in many places across the country the afghan security forces now stand ready to begin the process of taking over security responsibility. success in afghanistan requires a number of critical steps. the first is making sure the afghan security forces are able to secure their own territory. there have been well known problems especially with the afghan police but there has been real progress in the last two ye
led political entitlement. the death of bin laden presents the taliban with a moment of choice. al qaeda are weakened. their leader is dead. last month the u n adopted two separate sanctions regimes creating a clear distinction to separate taliban from al qaeda. local peace councils havbeen established in almost all afghanistan's provinces allow 1800 people from 17 provinces to be enrolled for reintegration. we should take this opportunity to send a clear message to the taliban that now is the time to break al qaeda and participate in a peaceful political process. in this task we need pakistan's assistance. as i discussed last week as much in pakistan's interest as britain or afghanistan. the taliban pose a more wolf read to the states of pakistan as well. mr. speaker there is no reason afghanistan should be destined to remain a broken country. it has fertile agricultural land and stands at the crossroads of asia's training program. it has succeeded in the past when not wracked by conflict. afghanistan has many challenges ahead. there are security issues and lack of government capa
released by taliban showing 16 men being executed. >> this is a graphic look at how brutal and ugly the war against the taliban can get. some of you may find this very disturbing. if you would like to turn away, this is a good time to do so. let's walk you through this video. it was released by the taliban, posted online. men wearing traditional pakistani garb, all of them with their hands tied behind their back. in front of them, you see three armed men, you assume these are taliban fighters. one of them is scolding the men who are lined up, accusing them of being enemies of islam, saying these executions are about to take place for six children. the military here vehemently denies those excuses took place. after the scolding is over, that's when you see and hear the gunfire. you see the men topple to the ground, some of them moaning and writhing in pain. we're not going so show you what happened next. some of the gunmen walk up to the men and shoot them again, sometimes in an effort too make sure they're dead. the military believes the men who were killed were police officers kidnapped du
rough. the coalition troops and the taliban moved on foot. the coalition also has helicopters that can get them between mountain tops. they would be back to walking around on foot. these are law that useful. -- a lot less useful. they are used for blowing up vehicles. in some places, you see more small arms. this sort of looks like a world war ii street battle on a smaller scale. guys running around with rifles and tossing grenades, things like that. on the coalition side, there is a significant air power aspect of it as well. the tactical security threats to nato troops. >> this is located in the far most peace which is a ride along the border. this is a critical area for cross border infiltration as well as a historic avenue and the movement of supplies. >> in terms of the risk to u.s. troops, how would you characterize this? >> i would characterize this as high as venture. there is a significant influx of insurgent fighters to the area. >> we are prepared to go on a mission, tell me about that and what it is for. >> this is a standard reconnaissance mission. we're going in there to
.s. troops open next year. panetta also said he hopes the taliban will be on the run. it is key they keep up the pressure now. >>> and panetta also said the leaders such as al-qaida chief al-zawahri is, to limit their ability . also he believes that al-zawahri may be over the border in pakistan's northwestern federally administered tribal area. the defense secretary will have to deal with tense relations with pakistan following the killing of osama bin laden there. he said there was efforts to help them in the hunt for al-qaida members. but he said they have helped in the past track some of them down. back to you. >> david, in kabul. >> political sacrifices are needed on both sides of the aisle to solve the budget critesis. will democrats and republicans move past the rhetoric when they sit down in the white house tomorrow. >> hi, to you john. goal to whack four trillion off of the deficit over 10 years. president obama emphasized the positive. >>ed -- the good news is, we agree on the big thingings. after racking up deficit debts we need to get our fiscal house in order. both sides are goin
the taliban to peace talk in the period when the u.s. forces draw down. it is key to keep pressure up now to give the country a chance of some reconciliation. speaking in capped har, the new defense chief said the focus of the trip is the handover of security to afghan forces. he acknowledged that the remain, "a lot more work to do in terms of being able to transition the responsibility to them." now that leon panetta has moved to iraq, his focus will be on the situation there and concerns as he said here about iranian weapons smuggling. after all, 15 u.s. troops were killed there last month. back to you. >> shannon: all right, david. thank you very much. crews in india are scrambling through wreckage at this hour, desperately searching for survivors of a deadly train crash. more than 100 people were hurt and at least 31 killed when this express train derailed near the city of luknow. the death toll has been rising all morning long. the train was heading to new delhi from calcutta when officials say 12 cars skidded off the tracks. ♪ ♪ >> shannon: much of the debate over reigning in th
is a real signal from the taliban and network they can go to a target right in the heart of the capital. if the karzai forces we've been training up can't defend -- they responded well in the emergency, we're told, but if they can't respond in kabul, isn't that a signal it's going to be a long haul, and maybe there is no legacy end of the tunnel? >> i think the reset of our afghan policy last week by the president was correct. i think it was long in coming. i was never a fan of the surge or the counterinsurgency doctrine. karzai is not a willing partner. last week this mumbai style shooting attack, it could have been worse. i would give the afghans a little credit, but it was staged by the hakani gnat wornetwork, protected group, protected by the pakistani government. that group comes over the border regularly, kills our troops and obviously now is prepared to shoot at big targets in afghanistan. it's a bad signal about how ready the pakistanis are to confront terror networks in their own country. >> jane harman from the woodrow wilson center, thank you very much. >>> and up next here,
the taliban a tactical defeat in the south, as significant as what we have done in 2001 when we first went into the country and very, very dramatic and the challenge we have is this president's decision to scale the forces down so significantly, by september of next year, puts that -- those gains at risk, and, also, puts at risk what we are trying to do in the east, next year between kabul and the pakistani border. >> jamie: sounds like the way you are describing it, we are on track. >> we're on track but i'm concerned, the forces coming up so quickly will put the mission at risk and remains to be seen whether we can accomplish the mission, and i don't like saying it but that is the truth. >> jamie: what about leadership? i have read reports and you can certainly tell me, whether it's is true or not, that hamid karzai is really not in control. we have seen a family member of his and also some people in the administration, there, be assassinated. >> look, karzai is what he is. i mean, there's a central government in afghanistan but it is a power broker, patron agent system, he shares power
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)